New home construction and pre-1994 houses to be remodeled Are required to have high-efficiency toilets and faucets

Starting Jan 1, 2014

New home construction and pre-1994 houses to be remodeled Are required to have high-efficiency toilets and faucets

The Water Conservation Act of 2009 (Senate Bill X7-7) was enacted in November 2009, requiring all water suppliers to increase water use efficiency.

 

Senate Bill 837 (Blakeslee) was signed into law by the Governor on July 30, 2011, amending California Civil Code Section 1102.6 by placing “water-conserving plumbing fixtures” on the Real Estate Transfer Disclosure Statement (TDS) in Section II – Seller’s Information.

 

In addition, in a state-wide effort to promote water conservation, Senate Bill 407 (Padilla) was signed into law by on October 11, 2009 which requires the replacement of all non-water conserving plumbing fixtures, as defined, in commercial and residential properties built prior to 1994 with water-conserving fixtures by either 2017 or 2019.

 

In a nutshell, if your house was built prior to 1994, it’ll need to be retrofitted with low flow devices (toilets, shower heads, faucets) when remodeled as of 2014. If not remodeled, the change still must take place by 2017 for all residences built prior to 1994… And for multi-family residential real properties and commercial properties, this deadline for compliance is extended until 2019.

 

In addition, beginning Jan 1, 2014 the bill also requires retrofit of non-compliant plumbing fixtures as a condition of receiving a building permit for major improvements or renovations.

 

Existing Law requires all water closets sold or installed in the state to use no more than an average of 1.6 gallons per flush. Further requires that on and after January 1, 2014, all water closets (toilets), other than institutional water closets, sold or installed in California must be high-efficiency water closets including water faucets.

 

High efficiency toilets (HET) are 1.28gpf (gallons per flush)… Most HET toilets are dual flushers. To achieve the 1.28 average gpf, the law specifies a certain ratio of a number 2 flush to a number 1 flush.

 

 

 

A number 2 flush can still be 1.6 gallons, and a number 1 flush would be less than 1 gallon. The average works out to the 1.28 number. Low-flow shower heads range from 1.0gpm to 2.5gpm (gallons per minute).